Cyberiafreak

"Fortunate are those who take the first steps.” ― Paulo Coelho

What is DisableDoubleMapping ?

Seems like .NET 2.0-based 32-bit application are loaded multiple times though in same app domain.

These ref assemblies are loaded multiple times into virtual address space unexpectedly and occupies the memory.

To resolve this, add this element as below. But I don’t see any MSDN article elaborating on this except this support link.

Note: This works for .NET 2.0 env only think so.. I don’t see this element in latest verisons/articles.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
    <configuration> 
        <runtime>
            <DisableDoubleMapping enabled="true" />
        </runtime>
    </configuration>

Some of the useful <runtime> Element in APP.Config.

<configuration>
   <runtime>
      <gcConcurrent enabled="true"/>
      <legacyUnhandledExceptionPolicy enabled="1"/>
   </runtime>
</configuration>
------------
<configuration>
   <runtime>
      <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
         <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity name="myAssembly"
                              publicKeyToken="32ab4ba45e0a69a1"
                              culture="neutral" />
             <bindingRedirect oldVersion="1.0.0.0"
                              newVersion="2.0.0.0"/>
         </dependentAssembly>
      </assemblyBinding>
   </runtime>
</configuration>
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September 11, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tips – Browse any .NET dll with Reflector easily

.NET reflector is a must tool for any core .NET developer in depth. Recently I started going back to digging assemblies for deeper understanding. If you have got reflector installed and wants to just launch the reflector on double click of an assembly.. then here is the tip.
1) Got to the reflector Exe path in command prompt  2) Type as in screenshot – > reflector.exe /register
You won’t be getting any message but it will silently facilitate you with double click launch and right click context addition too. Now you can dig into any assembly by just double clicking it 😉
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September 10, 2013 Posted by | .NET General, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

   

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